Posts tagged photography

Beautiful shot of the path to the Termas Geometricas (hot springs) in Chile’s lake district.
Photo by David Jank

Beautiful shot of the path to the Termas Geometricas (hot springs) in Chile’s lake district.

Photo by David Jank

March in remembrance of the first anniversary of the killing of Juan Pablo Jiménez.

Santiago, Chile — 27 February, 2014

Full set over on Flickr

Marcha Nacional por la Educacion - March 7, 2013

The second big student march of 2013. See more photos from this series on my Flickr account.

Don’t forget, you can also see more photos of beautiful Carabineras at Rouge y Pistolas

Ultima Marcha Nacional Por La Educación 2012 - 21 December 2012

Photos I took from yesterday’s final student education march of the year. 

See the full gallery over on Flickr.

Surreal photo from Carles Cerulla - taken down south at Quemchi, Chiloé. (here’s another view, since it almost defies belief)

Surreal photo from Carles Cerulla - taken down south at Quemchi, Chiloé. (here’s another view, since it almost defies belief)

Photographic insight from Matias Pinto.

Café con piernas (literally, Spanish for “coffee with legs”) is a coffee shop style popular in Chile where normal bartenders or waiters are replaced with females dressed in scanty clothing. Coffee shops with waitresses serving in miniskirts and heels to businessmen had long been popular, but bikinis and similar attire accelerated the trend by the mid-1990s. The shops are very numerous and popular in Santiago. It is frequently noted that the shops seem to contradict Chile’s traditionally conservative culture. - Wikipedia

Superb composition in this photo from pavlucha - the colour of Valparaíso and a cheeky perro to give the image some life.
It got me thinking about the origin of the iconic colourful homes and murals that cover the hills alongside the port of this historic city.  I found a great photo essay over at Digital Journal:

During the 60s and early 70s, groups of leftist revolutionary youth calling themselves the “Ramona Parra Brigades” painted beautiful murals in the city expressing in bright colours their defence of the workers, farmers, miners and indigenous groups, and to support the candidate and later president of Chile Salvador Allende.
Since then, the creation of murals has become one of the most important artistic activities in the city and the “Museo a Cielo Abierto” (Open Air Museum) of Cerro Bellavista is one of its best known expressions at the national and international level.

Superb composition in this photo from pavlucha - the colour of Valparaíso and a cheeky perro to give the image some life.

It got me thinking about the origin of the iconic colourful homes and murals that cover the hills alongside the port of this historic city.  I found a great photo essay over at Digital Journal:

During the 60s and early 70s, groups of leftist revolutionary youth calling themselves the “Ramona Parra Brigades” painted beautiful murals in the city expressing in bright colours their defence of the workers, farmers, miners and indigenous groups, and to support the candidate and later president of Chile Salvador Allende.

Since then, the creation of murals has become one of the most important artistic activities in the city and the “Museo a Cielo Abierto” (Open Air Museum) of Cerro Bellavista is one of its best known expressions at the national and international level.

Trees in Fog (Chile, 1939) from Life Magazine photographer John Swope. via: Craig Krull Gallery

Trees in Fog (Chile, 1939) from Life Magazine photographer John Swope. via: Craig Krull Gallery

Remarkable astrophotography from Chilean resident Stéphane Guisard.

Chiloé is a large island in the South of Chile. Some of its many churches are of the very few remaining XVIIIth century wooden churches in the world. For this reason they were selected among the 100 world monument in danger. Vilupulli church is one of the 16 churches of Chiloe that UNESCO declared as world heritage. It was built in the XVIIIth century and was visited by Darwin 1834; its bell tower is known as the thinnest and finest of chiloé churches. (source)

Native of the Lorraine region in France, Stéphane Guisard has been living in Chile since 1994 where he works as Optics engineer at the Very Large Telescope in the Atacama Desert. He is specialized in active optics, optical alignment and telescope optical and image quality improvement. 

See more of his incredible work at Los Cielos de América 

Last month saw the passing of experimental Chilean photographer Sergio Larraín. This image is a favourite of mine, but his work famously caught the eye of Henri Cartier-Bresson, and saw him earn the role as a contributing photographer for Magnum (gallery). 

Larrain was endlessly experimental. One afternoon in the 1950s, he was taking photographs outside Notre Dame in Paris and captured scenes between a couple which he only noticed when he developed the film. This provided the inspiration for Julio Cortázar’s extraordinary 1959 story The Devil’s Drool, which in turn was the basis for Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1966 film Blow-Up. - Guardian

Sergio Larraín, Village of Horcones, Fishermen daughters, 1957

Last month saw the passing of experimental Chilean photographer Sergio Larraín. This image is a favourite of mine, but his work famously caught the eye of Henri Cartier-Bresson, and saw him earn the role as a contributing photographer for Magnum (gallery). 

Larrain was endlessly experimental. One afternoon in the 1950s, he was taking photographs outside Notre Dame in Paris and captured scenes between a couple which he only noticed when he developed the film. This provided the inspiration for Julio Cortázar’s extraordinary 1959 story The Devil’s Drool, which in turn was the basis for Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1966 film Blow-Up. - Guardian

Sergio Larraín, Village of Horcones, Fishermen daughters, 1957


Like many cultures, the Mapuche have a deluge myth (epeu) in which the world is destroyed and recreated. The myth involves two opposing forces, Kai Kai(water, which brings death through floods) and Tren Tren (dry earth which brings sunshine). In the deluge almost all humanity is drowned, the few not drowned survive through cannabilism. At last only one couple is left and are told by a machi that they must give the waters their only child, which they do, restoring order to the world. - Wikipedia

Beautiful photography by Marcelo Montecino.

Like many cultures, the Mapuche have a deluge myth (epeu) in which the world is destroyed and recreated. The myth involves two opposing forces, Kai Kai(water, which brings death through floods) and Tren Tren (dry earth which brings sunshine). In the deluge almost all humanity is drowned, the few not drowned survive through cannabilism. At last only one couple is left and are told by a machi that they must give the waters their only child, which they do, restoring order to the world. - Wikipedia

Beautiful photography by Marcelo Montecino.

Some incredible photography on display in the National Geographic Photo Contest. I’ll feature this stunning image of Chile’s Atacama Desert to keep things relevant:

ATACAMA SUNSET: Setting sun lights up clouds over Salar de Atacama in north Chile. I took this photo in July 2011 and at that time clouds like this were worrying sign of more unusual snow fall which already blocked roads to Bolivia and Argentina. Thankfully this time it just served as spectacular canvas to a sunset and reminder how beautiful is the world we live in.
Salar de Atacama, Chile. (Photo and caption by Magdalena Rakita/Nature/National Geographic Photo Contest)

Some incredible photography on display in the National Geographic Photo Contest. I’ll feature this stunning image of Chile’s Atacama Desert to keep things relevant:

ATACAMA SUNSET: Setting sun lights up clouds over Salar de Atacama in north Chile. I took this photo in July 2011 and at that time clouds like this were worrying sign of more unusual snow fall which already blocked roads to Bolivia and Argentina. Thankfully this time it just served as spectacular canvas to a sunset and reminder how beautiful is the world we live in.

Salar de Atacama, Chile. (Photo and caption by Magdalena Rakita/Nature/National Geographic Photo Contest)

Valparaiso, 2007. 
One of my favourite shots from my first visit to Chile.

Valparaiso, 2007. 

One of my favourite shots from my first visit to Chile.